Spatial Analysis & Data Visualization @ SFSU
 

Publications

Richard LeGates

Richard LeGates, Think Globally, Act Regionally (Redlands, CA: ESRI Press, 2005)

An instructional module designed to teach students in undergraduate social science research methods courses to do spatial analysis and data visualization using ArcGIS. It consists of a twelve-chapter softback textbook, exercises, and a CD-ROM of exercise data. Additional supplemental material is featured on this website.

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Richard LeGates, "Using Spatial Data Visualization to Motivate Undergraduate Social Science Students," in Invention and Impact: Building Excellence in Undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education (Washington, D.C.: American Academy for the Advancement of Science)

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Richard LeGates, "Teaching Spatially Integrated Social Science Research Methods"
(Redlands, CA:
ESRI International Users Conference proceedings, Summer 2005)

Faculty in college-level social science and public policy courses rarely integrate systematic analysis of spatial dimensions of phenomena into their courses or teach students to use GIS software to get answers to social science and public policy questions. But space matters in the issues dealt with by political scientists, economists, urban planners, public administrators, and other social scientists and public policy professionals. Spatially integrated social science seeks to correct this shortcoming by integrating spatial concepts and GIS operations into social science courses. This paper describes projects in the United States to disseminate spatial thinking and GIS skills to social scientists and public policy professionals at the Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science (CSISS), the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), Academic Excellence and Geographic Information Systems (AEGIS), Science and GIS Unlocking Analysis and Research Opportunities (SAGUARO), Social Explorer, and the Space, Culture, and Urban Policy Project, which the author directs.

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Richard LeGates, "Visualizing Urbanization with GIS and Data Graphics." (Paper presented to the 2006 Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, March 7-11 2006, Chicago, Illinois)

This paper describes an approach to visualizing urbanization with GIS and data graphics that will be more fully developed in future conference papers and articles. The paper starts with a brief conventional account of the growth of cities and urbanization since 1000 ADE (including oft repeated simplifications and errors); describes Bertin, Tukey, Cleveland, and Tufte's theories of how to use data graphics to analyze spatial relationships and visually communicate findings; and summarizes principle cartographic texts on good mapping. The paper then describes key historical and contemporary data sources on urbanization and the growth of cities that can correct and deepen the conventional account, including data from historian Jan de Vries on urbanization in early modern Europe, Chandler and Fox's data on world urbanization, and contemporary UN and World Bank data on urban agglomerations and urbanization. The paper provides examples of data graphics and maps illustrating aspects of urbanization from classic sources (Adna Ferrin Weber, Kingsley Davis, Constantinis Doxiadis, Fernand Braudel) and then presents data graphics and maps created by the author from the four data sources to illustrate how modern communications theory and information technology can help with clearer analysis and better communication.

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Richard LeGates, "GIS in U.S. Urban Studies and Planning Education." (Paper presented to the 2006 CalGIS Meeting, April 4-7 2006, Santa Barbara, California)

This paper describes the current status of GIS education in U.S. urban studies and urban planning at the undergraduate and graduate level. The paper begins with a description of urban studies and planning programs in the United States. Based on an examination of curricular material on departmental websites, the paper then describes required and elective GIS courses in urban studies and urban planning programs in California and other states. The paper concludes that most undergraduate urban studies programs currently do not require their students to take a GIS course or include GIS as an elective. Some urban studies programs do include GIS courses taught in other programs such as geography and landscape architecture for credit in the major and a few teach their students GIS as part of computer applications, research methods, or data analysis courses. GIS is somewhat more prevalent in undergraduate urban planning programs, but most of these programs still do not require their majors to study GIS. In contrast GIS is now taught in most graduate urban planning programs—usually as electives or GIS coursework in other departments. A substantial number of graduate planning programs teach one or more required GIS courses themselves. Several urban planning programs have specializations in GIS that include multiple courses in GIS, remote sensing, CAD, spatial statistics, and related material. The paper discusses books and other material appropriate for introducing GIS to urban studies and planning students at different levels and in different types of institutions and showcases exemplary programs. It closes with a discussion of the author's instructional module: Think Globally, Act Regionally.

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Richard LeGates, "Information Technology, Spatial Analysis, and Comparative Urban Research."
(Paper presented to the Urban Affairs Association 2006 annual meeting, Toronto, Canada
April 2006)

This paper summarizes recent advances in information technology that are most important for understanding cities and regions worldwide, suggests the significance for planners of theoretical approaches to pedagogy from the emerging fields of GIScience and spatially integrated social science, summarizes major themes appropriate for comparative urban research, and describes an approach to teaching urban planners how to integrate the new information technologies for spatial analysis and data visualization into their teaching and research.

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Ayse Pamuk

Ayse Pamuk, Mapping Global Cities: GIS Methods in Urban Analysis. (Redlands, California: ESRI Press, 2006)

This book aims to reach to different types of audiences. The data and substantive matter contained in the five hands-on exercises and a self-directed project included in the CD are closely connected to discussions in the main chapters and provide readers immediate access to GIS analysis tools with international and United States data on population and housing. The book will be of interest to urban studies and planning students studying policy analysis, housing policy, and international development, as well as data analysis. International development professionals, human settlement experts in the developing world, and urban planning practitioners working in immigration gateway regions of the United States, Europe, and the developing world will also find the book useful. The book will appeal to researchers and scholars concerned with housing and human settlements policy analysis throughout the world.

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Ayse Pamuk, “Geography of Immigrant Clusters in Global Cities: A Case Study of San Francisco, 2000.” (International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 28(2): 287-307. June 2004)

Ayse Pamuk (panel organizer and editor), “Global Planning Pedagogy: Innovative Classroom Approaches” With Daniel Abramson, Carla Chifos, Paul Hess, Michael Leaf, Richard LeGates, Joe Nasr, Keith Pezzoli, and William Siembieada. (Based on 2004 ACSP roundtable presentations in the ACSP International Development track presentations.)

Ayse Pamuk, “Immigrant Clusters & Homeownership in Global Metropolises: Suburbanization Trends in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York” (Institute of Urban and Regional Development, U.C. Berkeley. Working paper WP-2004-02, July 2004.)

The premise of this paper is that immigrant homeownership patterns in global metropolitan housing markets are profoundly influenced by international migration dynamics and that homeownership for immigrants is realized in ethnic clusters in varying degrees and in unexpected locations of metropolitan regions. Research shows that ethnic clusters are increasingly emerging in different places -- particularly, in suburban areas of global metropolises as a result of some immigrants following networks of kin and friends along migration chains and bypassing inner cities altogether. In contrast to earlier theories on immigrant residential settlement patterns that view ethnic neighborhoods as disadvantaged “zones-in-transition,” some of these newer clusters have unexpectedly high homeownership rates.

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Ayse Pamuk, Data for Modules, Space Culture, and Urban Policy: Integrating GIS into Social Science Research Methods Courses (NSF grant DUE-0228878), Public Research Institute, SFSU.

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