Michael A. Goldman, Ph.D.

VITAE

 

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Download CV (updated 2/17/08)


 

Present Address:    

Department of Biology

San Francisco State University

San Francisco, CA   94132-1722

 

 

 

 

Tel. (415) 338-1549

Fax (415) 338-6907

Internet: goldman@sfsu.edu

 

Present Position:

Professor and Chair of Biology

Citizenship: USA

 

Education

Professional Meeting Organizing

Public Education

Academic  and Professional Experience

Professional Refereeing

Media Appearances & Quotations

Academic Publications

Professional Grant Reviewing

General Publications

Abstracts & Meeting Presentations

University Teaching Experience

Meetings & Courses Attended

Research & Education Funding

Additional Teaching Experience

Department, College and University Committees & Related Services

Professional Societies & Awards

 

 

 

Education [return to top]

 

Peabody Veterans Memorial High School, June 1972, magna cum laude, Peabody, MA 01960.

Bachelor of Arts in Biology, University of Rochester, May, 1976, magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, Rochester, NY 14627.

Ph.D., Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 1981, W. Lafayette, IN 47907.

Post-doctoral fellow, Medical Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, 1982-1983, Houston, TX 77030.

Senior fellow, Medical Genetics, University of Washington, 1984-1988, Seattle, WA 98195.

 

Academic  and Professional Experience [return to top]

 

Studied genetics of anomalous sex ratios, and enzyme polymorphism associated with the third chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura.  Prof. Satya Prakash and Dr. Gary Cobbs, Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, 1975-1976.

Doctoral dissertation:  Polyploidy and evolution in the genus Bulinus.  Advisor:  Prof. Philip T. LoVerde, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN, 1977-1981.

Post-doctoral trainee in medical genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, studying the relationship between temporal programming of DNA replication and gene expression in mammalian cells.  Supervisor:  Prof. Gerald P. Holmquist, Department of Medicine, 1982-1983.

Senior fellow in medical genetics, University of Washington, Seattle, studying chromatin structure and its relationship to X-chromosome inactivation, and X-chromosome inactivation in transgenic mice.  Supervisor:  Prof. Stanley M. Gartler, Departments of Genetics and Medicine, 1984-1988.

Assistant Professor of Biology, San Francisco State University, January 1988-September 1990. 

Associate Professor of Biology, San Francisco State University, September 1990-September 1995.

Section Chair, Cell, Molecular and Microbiology Programs, San Francisco State University, 1995-1999.

Professor of Biology, San Francisco State University, September 1995-present.

Associate Editor, North America, Chromosome Research, 2002-present.

Chair, Department of Biology Hiring, Retention, Tenure & Promotion Committee, 2002-2003.

Contributing Editor, Bio-IT World, 2003-present.

Member, Committee on Content & Instruction, National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, 2003-present.

Council delegate, Phi Beta Kappa Society, 2003-present.

Member, Faculty Consensus Group, California State University Program in Education & Research in Biotechnology, 2003-present.

Coordinator, Cell, Molecular & Microbiology Programs, San Francisco State University, 2002-present.

Advisory Board member, School to Career Program, San Francisco Unified School District, 2004-present.

Vice President, California Omicron Chapter, Phi Beta Kappa, 2005-present.

Chair, Advisory Board, Center for Computing for the Life Sciences, San Francisco State University, 2005-present.

Chair, Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, 2005-present.

 

Academic Publications [return to top]

 

M. A. Goldman, P. T. LoVerde, and C. L. Chrisman.  1980.  Comparative karyology of the freshwater snails Bulinus tropicus and B. natalensisCanadian Journal of Genetics and Cytology 22: 361-367.

M. A. Goldman, P. T. LoVerde, and C. L. Chrisman.  1983.  Hybrid origin of polyploidy in freshwater snails of the genus Bulinus.  Evolution 37: 592-600.

M. A. Goldman, P. T. LoVerde, C. L. Chrisman, D. A. Franklin, F. Matthews, R. J. Pitchford, and C. S. Richards.  1983.  Nucleolar organizer regions in Biomphalaria and Bulinus snails.  Experientia 39: 911-913.

M. A. Goldman, P. T. LoVerde, C. L. Chrisman and D. A. Franklin.  1984.  Chromosomal evolution in planorbid snails of the genera Bulinus and BiomphalariaMalacologia, International Journal of Malacology 25: 427-446.

M. A. Goldman, G. P. Holmquist, M. C. Gray, L. A. Caston and A. Nag.  1984.  Replication timing of mammalian genes and middle repetitive sequences.  Science 224: 686-692.

D. E. Riley, M. A. Goldman and S. M. Gartler.  1986.  Chromatin structure of active and inactive human X-linked phosphoglycerate kinase genes.  Somatic Cell and Molecular Genetics 12: 73-80.

M. A. Goldman, S. M. Gartler, E. A. Keitges, and D. E. Riley.  1986.  The utilization of the human phosphoglycerate kinase gene in the investigation of X-chromosome inactivation.  Horizons in Biochemistry and Biophysics:  Human Genes and Diseases, ed. F. Blasi.  John Wiley & Sons.

M. A. Goldman, K. R. Stokes, R. L. Idzerda, G. S. McKnight, R. L. Brinster and S. M. Gartler.  1987.  A chicken transferrin gene on the X chromosome of transgenic mice escapes X-chromosome inactivation.  Science 236: 593-595.

M. A. Goldman.  1988.  The chromatin domain as a unit of gene regulation.  BioEssays 9: 50-55.

D. E. Riley, M. A. Goldman & S. M. Gartler.  1991.  Nucleotide sequence of the 3' nuclease sensitive region of the human phosphoglycerate kinase gene.  Genomics 11: 212-214.

S. M. Gartler, K. A. Dyer & M. A. Goldman.  1992.  Mammalian X-chromosome Inactivation.  Molecular Genetic Medicine, Academic Press, v. 2, pp. 121-160. 

S. D. Colman, J. K. Mellott, A. S. Almeida, M. A. Goldman, P. van Tuinen & T. P. Yang.  1992.  Isolation and characterization of radiation-reduced hybrids containing portions of the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome: Identification of hybrids containing the Menkes' disease locus.  Somatic Cell & Molecular Genetics 18: 201-213.

M. A. Goldman.  1992.  The silence of the X.  Nature Genetics 2: 169-170.

Gartler, S.M., & M.A. Goldman.  1994.  Reactivation of inactive X-linked genes.  Developmental Genetics 15: 504-514.

M. A. Goldman. 1996. Beyond the pale. Current Biology 6: 1355.

M. A. Goldman. 1997. Executive decision: Chromatin structure and gene regulation. Trends in Genetics 13: 387-388.

M. A. Goldman, P. S. Reeves, C. M. Wirth, W. J. Zupko, M. A. Wong, S. Edelhoff & C. M. Disteche. 1998. Comparative methylation analysis of murine transgenes that undergo or escape X-chromosome inactivation. Chromosome Research 6: 397-404.

M. A. Goldman. 1998. Human Cloning: Science Fact & Fiction. Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal 8: 103-116.

S. C. Spusta & M. A. Goldman. 1998. Xistential Wanderings: The role of Xist RNA in X-chromosome inactivation. Current Science 77: 530-538.

S. M. Gartler & M. A. Goldman. 2000. X-chromosome inactivation. Encyclopedia of the Life Sciences. Macmillan Publishing, Ltd. http://www.macmillan-reference.co.uk/science/EncyclopediaLifeSci.htm

M. A. Goldman. 2000. Evolution rising from the grave. Nature 404: 15-16.

M. A. Goldman. 2001. Cloning reality into fiction. Nature Genetics 27: 15.

M. A. Goldman. 2001. Housekeeping genes. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Academic Press.

M. A. Goldman. 2001. CpG islands. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Academic Press.

S. M. Gartler & M. A. Goldman. 2001. The biology of the X chromosome 2000. Current Opinion in Pediatrics 13: 340-345.

M. A. Goldman. 2001. Discrimination: Beleaguered: Efforts at banning genetic discrimination. Gene Letter 2(16). www.geneletter.com, May 2001.

M. A. Goldman. 2001. Genomics: An Industry Perspective. Science 292: 1491-1492.

M. A. Goldman. 2001. Spandrels or selection? Nature 413: 252-253.

M. A. Goldman. 2002. The ABC’s of genomics. Nature Genetics 30: 357.

M. A. Goldman. 2002. Cancer: The chromatin connection. Trends in Genetics 18: 390-391.

M. A. Goldman. 2002. A virtual pharmacopeia. Bio-IT World, November 12. http://www.bio-itworld.com/archive/111202/virtual.html

M. A. Goldman. 2003. The ends and cancer. Drug Discovery Today 8: 294-296.

M. A. Goldman. 2003. The epigenetics of the cell. Genome Biology 4: 309-310.

M. A. Goldman. 2003. The challenge of molecular medicine. Bio-IT World, May 9.

M. A. Goldman. 2003. It’s time to take medicine digital. Bio-ITWorld, June 15. Also appeared in Health-IT World online.

M. A. Goldman. 2003. Living with the Neandertals, a review of Darwin’s Children, by G. Bear. Nature 424: 726 - 727.

M. A. Goldman. 2004. Promises and perils of technology’s future. Science 303: 629-630.

M. A. Goldman. 2004. Hip Hop to the Genome. Bio-ITWorld, 17 June.

M. A. Goldman. 2004. RNAi in research and therapy. Genome Biology 5: 342-344.

M. A. Goldman. 2004. Kindred spirits, a review of “The God gene.” Nature Genetics 36: 1241.

M. A. Goldman. 2004. Ring theory, a review of “The science of Middle-Earth.” Nature 432: 674-675.

 

 

Abstracts & Meeting Presentations [return to top]

 

Comparative karyology of two diploid species of Bulinus--B. tropicus and B. natalensis.  54th Ann. Meeting, American Society of Parasitologists, Minneapolis, MN, 1979.

Origin of polyploid Bulinus--evidence from comparative cytogenetics of diploids and tetraploids.  Second International Congress of Systematic and Evolutionary Biology, Vancouver, BC; 55th Ann. Meeting, American Society of Parasitologists, Berkeley, CA, 1980.

Chromosomal evolution in planorbid snails of the genera Bulinus and Biomphalaria.  Second International Symposium on Molluscan Genetics, New Orleans, LA, 1982.

Why G-bands?  The housekeeping and ontogenetic genomes.  8th International Chromosome Conference, Lubeck, Germany, 1983.

Replication timing and developmental regulation.  American Society of Human Genetics, Norfolk, VA, 1983.

Gene replication timing during development and transformation, and Dispersed repetitive sequence families specific to G-bands or R-bands.  Ann. Meeting, Genetics Society of America, Vancouver, BC, 1984.

Chromatin structure, X-chromosome inactivation, and housekeeping genes.  Ann. Meeting, Genetics Society of America, Boston, MA, 1985.

Human X-chromosome inactivation and chromatin structure and The chicken transferrin gene in transgenic mice.  International Congress of Human Genetics, West Berlin, Germany, 1986.

A chicken transferrin gene on the X chromosome of transgenic mice is not inactivated.  American Society of Human Genetics, Philadelphia, PA, 1986.

X-chromosome inactivation and chromatin structure of the human phosphoglycerate kinase gene.  American Society of Human Genetics, San Diego, CA, 1987.

Supercoilable loops and X-chromosome inactivation.  Gordon Conference on Nuclear Proteins, Chromatin and Gene Regulation, Tilton, NH, 1988.

Analysis of chromatin structure of Fra(X)(q27.3).  American Society of Human Genetics, New Orleans, LA, 1988.

Organization and evolution of the mammalian genome.  Invited lecture for the Biosystematists Society, San Francisco State University, Fall 1990.

Analysis of a human 3' phosphoglycerate kinase flanking region which is hypermethylated on the active X chromosome.  American Society of Human Genetics, Cincinnati, OH, 1990.

X-chromosome inactivation and DNA methylation in transgenic mice.  West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, 1990.

X-chromosome inactivation and DNA methylation of X-linked transgenes.  International Congress of Human Genetics, Washington, DC, 1991.

Isolation and characterization of radiation-reduced hybrids containing portions of the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome.  International Congress of Human Genetics, Washington, DC, 1991.

X-chromosome inactivation, methylation and imprinting in transgenic mice.  West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, 1991.

The chromatin domain as a unit of X-chromosome inactivation.  American Society of Human Genetics, San Francisco, CA,  1992.

Chromatin structure and the silencing of the X.  Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA.  January 1994.

Ever since Mendel: The new epigenetics. U. S. Food & Drug Administration, Alameda, CA, August 1994.

The unit of developmental gene regulation, X-chromosome inactivation, and imprinting. University of California, San Francisco, March 1995.

Analysis of chromatin domains using VM-26 inhibition of topoisomerase II.  Keystone Symposium on Molecular and Cellular Biology: The Nuclear Matrix, Hilton Head Island, SC, April 1995.

Domains of silence: Transcriptional repression in development. Colloquium in Cell, Molecular and Microbiology. San Francisco State University, September 1995.

Analysis of chromatin domains on the X chromosome, and their role as functional units in the regulation of X-chromosome inactivation. American Society of Human Genetics, Minneapolis, MN,  1995.

Chromatin domains and X-chromosome inactivation. West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Conference, Pacific Grove, CA, December 1995.

Assault on science: The anti-science movement in America. Colloquium in Cell, Molecular and Microbiology, San Francisco State University, February 1996.

Heterochromatic domains and gene silencing. Colloquium in Cell, Molecular and Microbiology, San Francisco State University, September 1996.

Gene regulation at the domain level. San Jose State University, September 1996.

Chromatin organization of an X-linked transgene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation. American Society of Human Genetics, San Francisco, CA, October 1996.

In vivo footprinting of the human XIST promoter on the active and inactive human X chromosomes. American Society of Human Genetics, San Francisco, CA, October 1996.

Analysis of topoisomerase II sites in a transferrin transgene. West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, December 1996.

Chromatin domain organization of an X-linked transgene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation. FASEB Research Conference: Chromatin and Transcription, Snowmass, Colorado, July 1997.

Mapping the chromatin domain endpoints of an X-linked transgene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation. American Society of Human Genetics, Baltimore, MD, October 1997.

Computer-assisted prediction and experimental verification of matrix attachment regions (MARs) in the human retinoblastoma gene. American Society of Human Genetics, Baltimore, MD, October 1997.

Comparative methylation analysis of transgenes that undergo or escape X-chromosome inactivation. American Society of Human Genetics, Baltimore, MD, October 1997.

Computer-aided prediction of matrix attachment regions (MARs) in the human retinoblastoma gene. Keystone Symposium: The nuclear matrix: involvement in genomic organization, function and regulation, Copper Mountain, CO, April 1998.

In vivo footprint analysis of normal and mutant XIST promoters on the active and inactive human X chromosomes. Keystone Symposium: The epigenetic regulation of transcription, Copper Mountain, CO, April 1998.

DNase I sensitivity of two X-linked transgenes. American Society of Human Genetics, Denver, CO, October 1998.

Nuclease sensitivity of X-linked transgenes. West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, December 1998.

Human cloning: The tooth of the matter. Medico-Dental Study Guild of California, Univ. of the Pacific School of Dentistry, San Francisco, May 1999.

Ethics in Science. City College of San Francisco NIH Scholars Program, San Francisco, September 1999.

Identification of a matrix attachment region at the X-linked transferrin locus. American Society of Human Genetics, San Francisco, CA, October 1999.

An XIST promoter mutation associated with skewed X inactivation alters the pattern of transcription factor binding. American Society of Human Genetics, San Francisco, CA, October 1999.

Society versus Molecular Medicine. North Valley & Mountain Biotechnology Center, Sacramento, November 1999.

The X-linked transferrin gene is flanked by a matrix attachment region. West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, December 1999.

Dao, T. P., and M. A. Goldman. X-chromosome inactivation in transgenic mice: the primacy of the chromatin domain. West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, December 2000. Biochemistry & Cell Biology 79: 366 (2001).

Controversy in the genome era. Modesto Area Partners in Science, Modesto, CA, March 2001.

ALIVE AGAIN: The human cloning debate. Bay Area Science Symposium, Foothill College, Los Gatos, CA, May 2001.

Genophobia in the age of genomic medicine. Celera Diagnostics, Inc., Alameda, CA, January 2002.

Skrenchuk, A., & M. A. Goldman. MARs/SARs in the 11p15.4 Olfactory Receptor Cluster. Chromatin Structure & Function: State of the Art, Bethesda, MD, May 2002.

M. A. Goldman, A. Skrenchuk. 2002. Nuclear matrix attachment regions in an olfactory receptor gene cluster. American Society of Human Genetics, Baltimore, MD, October 2002.

A. Skrenchuk, M. A. Goldman. 2002. International West Coast Chromatin & Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, 12-15 December 2002. Abstract published in Biochemistry & Cell Biology.

M. T. Wuerth, M. A. Goldman. 2003. Nuclear matrix attachment regions and cancer translocations. American Society of Human Genetics, Los Angeles, CA, October 2003.

M. T. Wuerth, M. A. Goldman. 2003. Bioinformatic analysis of MAR’s associated with cancer translocations. International West Coast Chromatin & Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, December 2003. Abstract to be published in Biochemistry & Cell Biology.

M. A. Goldman & E. H. Blackburn. 2004. The role of scientists in ethical and societal issues. Univ. California, San Francisco, CA, March 2004.

M. A. Goldman. 2004. Educating the workforce for the age of personalized medicine. IBM-Burrill Life Sciences Partnering Conference, San Francisco, CA, September 2004.

 

 

 

Research & Education Funding [return to top]

 

Grants as Principal Investigator

 

Research Corporation/Bristol Myers Company grant to fund research, "The mechanism of X-chromosome inactivation," June 1989-1992, $21,000.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant, "X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting in transgenic mice."  June, 1991-May 1994.  $113,000.

NIH grant, “Analysis of chromatin domains in X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting,” June 1995-present. $106,000.

NIH grant, “Supplemental for minority undergraduate education,” June 1995-present, $22,000.

NIH Minority Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) grant, “The chromatin domain as a unit of X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting,” September 1995-December 1998,  $229,000.

NIH Minority Biomedical Research SCORE Grant, “Mapping of chromatin border elements in the mammalian genome.” Funded 7/15/98. $957,891 over 4 years.

 

Grants as Co-Principal Investigator or Participant

 

State Department of Education, Environmental Education Grant.  "Environmental and ethical issues in biotechnology."  Funded at $30,000, October 1990. 

National Science Foundation (NSF).  November 1991.  "Instruments and Laboratory Improvement:  Molecular biology laboratory instrumentation for undergraduate instruction."  $100,000. 

NSF, August 1991.  "A teacher training program in biology: The science, techniques and ethics of molecular biology."  $372,966 over two years.  Pending. 

NIH "Initiatives for Minority Students: Bridges for the Future" grant.  Funded, September 1992, at $300,000.

Department of Energy Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN), providing research support for women and minority graduate students.  Awarded, 1994. Currently active. 

U. S. Department of Education, Women and Minorities Preparation for Graduate Education (WMPGE).

NIH Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC), providing a research experience for minority undergraduate students.  Awarded 1995.  $2,507,438. 

NIH Research Enhancement for Undergraduates, providing research opportunities for undergraduate students. Active.

NIH Research Infrastructure for Minority Institutions (RIMI). Funded October 1996.

NIH Research Initiative for Student Enhancement. Funded 1999.

NIH Bridges to the Baccalaureate, a program to assist minority students at community colleges to enter research careers via San Francisco State University. 1995-present.

NIH Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC), providing a research experience for minority undergraduate students.  Renewal pending, 2000.

NIH Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program, providing research experience for recent graduates. Pending, 2001.

 

 

Professional Societies & Awards [return to top]

 

Bausch & Lomb Science Scholarship, University of Rochester, 1972-1976. Elected to Phi Beta Kappa, University of Rochester, 1976. Elected to full membership, Society of Sigma Xi, 1981. AAAS, 1977-1991; Genetics Society of America, 1977-1990; Society for the Study of Evolution, 1977-1985; American Society of Parasitologists, 1979-1982; Society of Sigma Xi, 1981-present; American Society of Human Genetics, 1982-present; Biosystematists Society, 1988-present, Society for Developmental Biology, 1994-present; DNA Methylation Society, 1994-present, Northern California Science Writers Association, 1997-present, National Association of Science Writers, 2000-present, American Medical Writers Association, 2001-present, Society for Ethics in Humanities, 2001-present; International Society for Computational Biology, 2002-present.

 

Professional Meeting Organizing [return to top]

 

International West Coast Chromatin and Chromosomes Meeting, annually at Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California, 1998-present.

 

Professional Refereeing [return to top]

 

Professional Journal Refereeing: Science, Human Genetics, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Nucleic Acids Research, Nature Genetics, Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics, Canadian Journal of Zoology, Molecular and Cellular Biology, and American Journal of Human Genetics.

 

Textbook reviewing: University Science Books, Academic Press, W. B. Saunders, W. H. Freeman, Garland Publishing, Wm. C. Brown Publishers, Stockton Press, Addison-Wesley-Longman, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, Wiley Interscience, and Jones & Bartlett.

 

Editorial advisory board: For Encyclopedia of the Life Sciences, Stockton Press, 1997-present. Responsibility for outlining and assigning articles in human genetics.

 

Reviewer: For Encyclopedia of the Human Genome, Nature/Macmillan Publishing, London, 2001-present.

 

Reviewer: For Encyclopedia of Genetics, Harcourt Publishing, New York, 2001-present.

 

Associate Editor: Responsible for North American submissions in animal and human systems, Chromosome Research (Springer), 2002-present.

 

Referee, Public Broadcasting System program on human cloning, KCTS, Seattle, WA, 2002.

 

Contributing Editor: Bio-IT World, IDG Press, Lexington, MA, 2003-present.

 

 

Professional Grant Reviewing [return to top]

 

National Institutes of Health, Academic Research Enhancement Award. Panel reviewer, Bethesda, MD, October 1996 and 1997.

 

National Institutes of Health, Office for Protection from Research Risks, Science Education Partnership Awards. Panel reviewer, Chevy Chase, MD, 2 February 1999.

 

National Institutes of Health, Minority Biomedical Research Support Grant. Panel reviewer, Chevy Chase, MD, 24-26 February 1999.

 

National Institutes of Health, Office for Protection from Research Risks, Science Education Partnership Awards. Panel reviewer, Chevy Chase, MD, 30 January – 1 February 2001.

 

National Science Foundation, GK-12 Fellowship Program. Panel reviewer, Arlington, VA, 18-19 October 2001.

 

National Institutes of Health, Office for Protection from Research Risks, Science Education Partnership Awards. Panel reviewer, Chevy Chase, MD, February 2002.

 

National Institutes of Health, National Center for Minority & Health Disparities. Panel reviewer, Loan Repayment Program, Bethesda, MD, September 2002.

 

National Institutes of Health, National Center for Minority & Health Disparities. Panel reviewer, Loan Repayment Program, Bethesda, MD, February 2004.

 

CancerCare, Manitoba, Canada, internal grants reviewer, May 2004.

 

University of Washington internal grants reviewer, Seattle, WA, June 2004.

 

National Institutes of Health, National Center for Minority & Health Disparities. Panel reviewer, Loan Repayment Program, Bethesda, MD, March 2005.

 

National Institutes of Health, National Center for Minority & Health Disparities. Panel reviewer, Loan Repayment Program, Bethesda, MD, May 2005.

 

 

 

University Teaching Experience [return to top]

 

Developmental Biology.  San Francisco State University.  Spring, 1988-2001. Capstone course for undergraduate Cell & Molecular Biology majors and graduate students.

Laboratory in Genetic Engineering.  San Francisco State University, Spring, 1988 & 1989. Intensive laboratory experience in recombinant DNA technology for students in graduate certificate program.

Special Projects in Genetic Engineering.  San Francisco State University, Fall, 1988, 1989 & 1990.

Seminar:  Molecular Biology of Development. San Francisco State University, Fall, 1988 and 1991.

Genetics.  San Francisco State University, Fall 1989-2002. General genetics for Biology and Biochemistry majors, and for pre-medical students.

Human Biology Laboratory for non-science majors.  San Francisco State University, Fall 1990.

Colloquium in Microbiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, San Francisco State University, every semester, 1995-1999, 2003.

Ethical Issues in Science and Technology, San Francisco State University, Spring 1999-2004. Emphasizes bioethics, including gene testing, gene therapy, and the use of human and animal subjects in research, for a general University audience.

Topics in computing for the life sciences, San Francisco State University, Spring 2004. Co-taught with Computer Science faculty for graduate students in Computer Science.

Pharmacogenomics. San Francisco State University, Spring 2004.

 

Additional Teaching Experience [return to top]

 

NSF High School Teacher Training in Biotechnology Workshop.  San Francisco State University, Summer 1989-1994. A full-time two-week workshop with laboratory and lecture experience in recombinant DNA technology and human genetics for in-service high school teachers. A three-day symposium on related ethical issues, and visits to classrooms, are provided.

Molecular Biology.  Viral & Rickettsial Disease Laboratory, California State Department of Public Health, Berkeley, Summer 1989. An eight-hour lecture series for the Laboratory’s professional and technical staff.

NSF Chautauqua Short Course on Recombinant Biology.  San Francisco State University, Summer 1990 and 1991. A full-time two-week workshop with laboratory and lecture experience in recombinant DNA technology and human genetics for faculty and two-year and four-year colleges.

NSF Chautauqua Short Course on Molecular Techniques in Systematic and Evolutionary Biology.  San Francisco State University, Spring 1992, Spring and Summer 1993. Full-time one- to two-week lecture and laboratory experience for college faculty, providing support to allow teaching of recombinant DNA techniques and introduction of the technology in established research programs in systematic and evolutionary biology.

Molecular Biology Short Course, Beckman Instruments, Inc. 1992-1994. Seven four-day courses designed to help company executives, sales, research and development personnel understand molecular biology and the Human Genome Project.

Genome Education for Elder Americans, Elderhostel, San Francisco State University, October 1993.

High School Teacher Education in Genetics and Molecular Biology, San Francisco Unified School District, summers, 1993-1997. A full-time two-week workshop with laboratory and lecture experience in recombinant DNA technology and human genetics for in-service high school teachers. Assistance with implementation in the San Francisco School District provided.

 

 

Public Education [return to top]

 

Instructor: Four two-hour lectures on Eukaryotic Molecular Biology to laboratory technicians and scientists for the State of California, Department of Health Services, at Berkeley, 1989.

Lecturer:  Biology classes at Aragon High School (San Mateo) on three  occasions in 1990-1992.

Speaker:  UCSF Mini-Course on the Practice of Science in a session entitled "Career options outside of a research-oriented university" in June 1992.  I described my role at SFSU to graduate students and post-doctoral fellows who might be considering career options at this time.

Judge:  High School Science Symposium sponsored by the Lawrence Hall of Science, in 1989, 1992 and 1993. 

Consultant:  Exploratorium concerning the assembly of a display on molecular biology. 1993.

Instructor:  Genome Education for Elder Americans, Elderhostel, San Francisco State University, October 1993.

Consultant:  “Winding Your Way Through DNA Curriculum Development Project.”  1993-present. Producing three videotapes for high school and middle school, concerning careers in science, history of science, and the nature of genetic disease.

Instructor:  NSF Chautauqua Short Course on Molecular Techniques in Systematic and Evolutionary Biology.  San Francisco State University, Spring 1992, Spring and Summer 1993.

Instructor:  Molecular Biology Short Course, Beckman Instruments, Inc. Seven 4-day courses between August 1992 and August 1994.

Lecturer:  Gunn High School (Palo Alto) in 1993, 1994, and 1995, talking to and with students in three to four classes each year.

Lecturer:  Santa Clara County Biotechnology Education Program summer workshop for high school teachers, 1995.

Presenter: For whom does The Bell Curve? San Francisco State University interdisciplinary faculty critique of the best-selling book. April 1995.

Presenter: UCSF Graduate Student Career & Research Day, concerning careers at comprehensive universities, Univ. of California, San Francisco, April 1996.

Instructor: Biotechnology. For the teachers of San Francisco Unified School District, two weeks, June 1996, at San Francisco State University.

Presenter: Stanford Human Genome Education Program - Palo Alto Unified School District summer program, Palo Alto High School, July 1996.

Lead Instructor: Molecular Biology for the Inexperienced. Funded by the National Science Foundation Undergraduate Faculty Enhancement Program, two weeks, July 1996, at San Francisco State University.

Instructor: Biotechnology. For the teachers of San Francisco Unified School District, two weeks, June 1997, at San Francisco State University.

Presenter: Stanford Human Genome Education Program - Palo Alto Unified School District summer program, Palo Alto High School, July 1997.

Featured speaker: Human cloning: The tooth of the matter. Medico-Dental Study Guild of California, University of the Pacific School of Dentistry,
San Francisco, May 1999.

Featured speaker: Medico-Dental Guild of California, San Francisco, “Beyond the sequence: The new human epigenome,” May 2000.

Lecturer: The stem cell controversy, Gunn High School program in Biotechnology Theory and Practice, Palo Alto, CA, November 2000.

Classroom speaker: Gunn High School, 14 February 2001.

Featured speaker: Controversy in the genome era. Modesto Area Partners in Science, Modesto, CA, March 2001.

Featured speaker: ALIVE AGAIN: The human cloning debate. Bay Area Science Symposium, Foothill College, Los Gatos, CA, May 2001.

Genophobia in the age of genomic medicine. Celera Diagnostics, Inc., Alameda, CA, January 2002.

Genetics of multiple sclerosis. The Boston Home, Dorchester, MA, 11 February 2002.

Human cloning: Science fact or fiction. San Francisco State University NEXA: Science-Humanities Convergence Symposium, 11 November 2002.

Homer Simpson & the Clone Myth. City College of San Francisco, September 2003.

Role of scientists in bioethics. Panel discussion with Elizabeth H. Blackburn. Practice of Science Symposium, Post-doctoral Fellows Association, University of California, San Francisco, March 2004.

Cloning and stem cells. Classroom speaker at Gunn High School, Palo Alto, CA, 10 March 2004.

 

 

Media Appearances & Quotations [return to top]

 

Interview:  National Hispanic Television program Telemundo, discussing the genetics and biology of twin formation.  September 1991.

Quotation:  In Scientific American, concerning the complexity of genetics and the fact that the DNA sequence is not adequate to specify an organism.  October 1993, page 28.

Quotation:  In the Journal of  National Institutes of Health Research, concerning the significance of recent discoveries in my field.  January, 1993, page 65.

Guest, “Talk of the City,” Los Angeles National Public Radio affiliate KPCC, 12 January 1998, answering questions on human cloning.

Guest, “Bay Area Forum,” San Francisco public television news program. Discusses implications of human cloning. September 1998.

Jacket copy for Glenn McGee’s The human cloning debate, Berkeley Hills Books, September 1998.

Jacket copy for Richard Gordon’s The hierarchical genome and differentiation waves: Novel unification of development, genetics and evolution. Singapore: World Scientific, and London: Imperial College Press, 1999.

Quoted: On subject of genetic enhancement, Wall Street Journal Millennium Edition, Wall Street Journal-Asia, Wall Street Journal-Europe, and Wall Street Journal-Australia, 28 December 1999.

Guest: Cityvisions Radio, KALW National Public Radio San Francisco, on the genetically modified food controversy. 11 March 2001.

Live televised analysis, Bush decision on stem cells, KNTV San Jose (NBC), 9 August 2001.

Commentary: Letter published in The Wall Street Journal, entitled “Send in the clones,” 9 August 2001.

Quoted: On subject of human cloning, Jewish Bulletin of Northern California, 17 August 2001.

Taped televised analysis, stem cell availability, KNTV San Jose (NBC), 27 August 2001.

Guest: Stem Cell Controversy, radio call-in on the John Rothmann Show, KGO/ACB Radio, San Francisco, 20 May 2002.

Forum article: “Good science, symbolic law,” on the California stem cell legislation. San Francisco Chronicle, 7 October 2002.

Interviewed: KCBS Radio, San Francisco, on international stem cell consortium. 1 January 2003.

Interview: Stem cell controversy, KCMO 710 AM, Kansas City, MO, February 2004.

 

General Publications [return to top]

 

Letter published in The Wall Street Journal, July 29, 1993, concerning the inaccuracy of the biology behind the book and film, Jurassic Park.

Letter published in The New Republic concerning editorials appearing in that journal and in the San Francisco Examiner.  The letter attempts to clarify crucial issues in human genetics, prenatal diagnosis, and the ultimate peril and promise of eugenics. November 21, 1994,
page 5.

Concept sidebar in Addison-Wesley Biotechnology Manual, 1995. Prenatal diagnosis of genetic diseases.

Issues essay in Addison-Wesley Biotechnology Manual, 1995. Curing genetic diseases.

Essay in Current Biology 6: 1355 (1996). Beyond the Pale.

Op-Ed column in the Los Angeles Times, 8 January 1998, on human cloning, entitled “Not just a reproductive choice.” Reprinted in Minneapolis Star Tribune, 13 January 1998, and Sacramento Bee,
26 January 1998.

Book review: Michael Cordy’s The Miracle Strain: A genetic thriller. Sunday Book Review, The San Francisco Chronicle, 1 March 1998.

Article: Human Cloning: Science Fact & Fiction. Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal 8: 103-116.

Letter published in the New York Times, 20 November 1998, p. A30, entitled “Egg-o-centric view,” concerning the use of cow eggs in human stem cell research.

Op-Ed column in the San Francisco Chronicle, 10 May 1999, page A21, on human embryonic stem cell technology, entitled “Open, don’t restrict, embryonic stem cell research.”

Forum article in the Sacramento Bee, 19 September 1999, page I-1, entitled “Human cloning is a disaster in the making: A scientist’s case.”

Letter published in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Hidden dangers of gene therapy,” 27 September 1999, page A35.

Letter published in the Philadelphia Post-Gazette, “Gene therapy pitfalls,” 30 July 2000.

Essay published in Insight (Washington, DC), “If human cloning becomes a reality, should it be a legal option?” 25 September 2000, pages 41 and 43.

Book review: Evolution rising from the grave, on Greg Bear’s Darwin’s Radio. Nature 404: 15-16, 2000.

Book review:  Cloning reality into fiction, on John Darnton’s The Experiment. Nature Genetics 27: 15, 2001.

Book review: M. A. Goldman. 2001. Genomics: An Industry Perspective. Science 292: 1491-1492.

Book Review: M. A. Goldman. 2001. Spandrels or selection? Nature 413: 252-253.

Commentary: Letter published in The Wall Street Journal, entitled “Send in the clones,” 9 August 2001.

Commentary: Letter in The Wall Street Journal, entitled “We fear the idea of a cloned human…” 14 December 2001.

Response to Charles Krauthammer on human therapeutic cloning. The New Republic, 3 June 2002. 

Op-Ed, “Real science, symbolic law.” San Francisco Chronicle, 7 October 2002, page A21.

Op-Ed, “Bush’s moralism on stem cell research is misguided.” Pacific News Service, online 17 September 2004 (pacificnews.org).

 

 

 

Meetings & Courses Attended [return to top]

 

Extraterrestrial Life, Northern California Science Writers Association, San Carlos, CA, 12 June 2000.

The Next Twenty Years in Medicine: Genomics Revolution, Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco, CA, 28 June 2000.

Genome 2000. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 8-11 August 2000.

American Society of Human Genetics, Philadelphia, PA, 3-8 October 2000.

American Anthropological Association, San Francisco, CA, 15-19 November 2000.

American Society of Hematologists, San Francisco, CA, 1-5 December 2000.

West Coast Chromatin & Chromosomes Meeting, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA, 6-9 December 2000.

American Society of Cell Biologists, San Francisco, CA, 9-13 December 2000.

Genetics and Justice Symposium, Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences, Radisson Marina, Berkeley, CA, 6 January 2001.

American Association for the Advancement of Science, San Francisco, CA, 16-19 February 2001.

Genome Tri-Conference, San Francisco, CA, 3-9 March 2001.

Bay Area Biotechnology Reception. British Consulate-General, San Francisco, April 2001.

Bay Area Science Symposium, Foothill College, Los Gatos, CA, May 2001.

Beyond Genome Conference, San Francisco, CA, 19-22 June 2001.

Biotechnology and Information Technology Summit, Univ. California, San Francisco, CA, 20-22 May 2001.

California Biomedical Research Association meeting, San Francisco, CA, 23-24 May 2001.

Health in the Digital Age, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 9-11 September 2001.

Northern California Science Writers Association, presentation by Irving Weissman (Stanford University) on stem cells, San Carolos, CA, 11 September 2001.

Genomes & Genetics, City College of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 29 September 2001.

American Society of Human Genetics, San Diego, CA, 11-16 October 2001.

Chips to Hits symposium, San Diego, CA, 28 October-1 December 2001.

Science Writers Workshop, Northern California Science Writers Association, San Francisco, CA, 3 November 2001.

West Coast Chromatin & Chromosomes Conference. Pacific Grove, CA, 9-13 December 2001.

Teaching Science & Religion. Templeton Foundation, San Jose, CA, 5-9 January 2002.

Personalized medicine, San Francisco, CA, 23-25 January 2002.

American Association for the Advancement of Science, Boston, MA, 14-19 February 2002.

Genome Tri-Conference, Santa Clara, CA, 23-29 February 2002.

The transcriptome, The Institute for Genome Research, Seattle, WA, 17-20 March 2002.

Beyond Genome, San Diego, CA, 2-7 June 2002.

Biotechnology and Information Technology Summit, Univ. California, San Francisco, CA, 24-25 June 2002.

Post-genomic bioinformatics, San Francisco, CA, 25-26 June 2002.

Comparative mouse genomics symposium, Seattle, WA, 28-30 July 2002.

Center for Genetics & Society, Oakland, CA, 23 August 2002.

Molecular Basis of Aging, Seattle, WA, 17-18 September 2002.

Public Broadcasting System video conference on Our Genes/Our Choices, KQED Studios, San Francisco, CA, 1 October 2002.

American Society of Human Genetics, Baltimore, MD, October 2002.

Telomeres, telomerases and cancer, American Association for Cancer Research, San Francisco, CA, 7-10 December 2002.

International West Coast Chromatin & Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, 11-14 December 2002.

American Society for Cell Biology, San Francisco, CA, 14-18 December 2002.

National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, Bethesda, MD, 28-31 January 2003.

Molecular Medicine Marketplace, Santa Clara, CA, 17-21 March 2003.

International Biotech/Infotech Summit, San Francisco, CA, 12-13 May 2003.

Beyond Genome, San Diego, CA, 16-19 June 2003.

California State University Program on Education & Research in Biotechnology conferences on Applied and Professional Master’s Degree Programs and Faculty Consensus Group meeting, Long Beach, CA, 8-9 July 2003.

Phi Beta Kappa Triennial Council meeting, Seattle, WA, 6-10 August 2003.

American Society for Cell Biology, San Francisco, December 2003.

California State University Program in Education & Research in Biotechnology, San Jose, CA, January 2004.

Molecular Medicine Marketplace, San Francisco, CA, March 2004.

Biotechnology Industry Organization BIO 2004, San Francisco, CA, June 2004.

Beyond Genome, San Francisco, CA, June 2004.

DNA Replication & Genome Integrity, Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA, August 2004.

TechNation Summit, San Francisco, CA, September 2004.

Burrill Life Sciences Partnering Conference, San Francisco, CA, September 2004.

American Association for Cancer Research Prevention Meeting, Seattle, WA, October 2004.

American Society of Human Genetics, Toronto, Canada, October 2004.

West Coast Chromatin & Chromosomes Meeting, Pacific Grove, CA, December 2004.

 

 

Department, College and University Committees & Related Services [return to top]

 

Department of Biology Curriculum Committee (Member, 1989; Chair, 1989-1994)

School/College of Science Safety Committee (Member, 1988-1990, Chair, 1990-present)

Department of Biology Scholarship Committee (1988-1992, 1999-present)

California Faculty Association representative to the Public Safety Council (1989-present)

Department of Biology Safety Committee (Chair, 1988-present)

Department of Biology Council (1991-present)

Department of Biology Teaching Evaluation Committee (1992)

College of Science & Engineering Conservation Genetics Laboratory Steering Committee (1992-present)

San Francisco State University Minority Enhancement Program Steering Committee (1992-1993)

Search Committee, Population Geneticist (1993-1994)

University Animal Care and Use Committee (Chair, 1993-present)

Biology Hiring Committee (1993-present)

Biology Retention, Tenure & Promotion Committee (1993-1999; 2002-present)

Section Chair, Cell, Molecular & Microbiology Group (1995-1999)

Search committee chair, Developmental Biologist (1995-1996)

Radiation Safety Committee (acting chair, 1997-1998; chair 1999-present)

M.A. program in Human Sexuality (advisory committee member, 1998-present)

San Francisco State University Faculty Merit Increase Appeals Committee, 2000-2001.

Phi Beta Kappa Committee on Members in Course, 2001-present.

Eden Staff Appreciation Award Advisory Committee, 2001-present.

Biology Hiring, Retention, Tenure & Promotion Committee, Chair, 2002-2003.

Bioinformatics Search Committee, 2003-present.

Faculty representative to California State University Biotechnology Program, 2003-present.

Section Chair, Cell, Molecular & Microbiology Group, 2003-present.

Chair, Department of Biology, 2005-present.

 

 

Updated 8/15/05