RAZA 680.01 #14676

RAZA COMMUNITY ORGANIZING [CESD]

COURSE SYLLABUS

Spring 2004

MWF, 1410 - 1500, BH 352

Professor Jose B. Cuellar, Ph.D. (http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~josecuel/)

Email: josecuel@sfsu.edu      Vmail: 415 338-6044  

Office hours in Psychology 422 on MWF 8-9 am and 1-2 pm.  

Expanded Course Description

The focus on this upper division Raza Studies course is on community organizing among Latinos in the United States.   We critically examine the potentials and limitations of mass mobilization and collective action toward the resolution of community problems.   We evaluate various elements and techniques for organizing individuals, developing community leaders and resources, acquiring and directing personal and public power.    We analyze existing organizations and the effects of their definitions of community priorities and goals. (Formerly LARA 680).

This course presents multiple models and methods of community organizing to enhance our critical understanding of how hegemonic values and actions by dominant individuals, institutions and ideologies affect la Raza community, and evaluate the development of grassroots organizing in a historical context. We examine community organizing among documented and undocumented rural farm workers and urban day laborers, barrio youth and suburban students, mujeres and personas mayors, immigrants and natives, from coast to coast.   The core of this course is its community service-learning format with students serving at least three hours per week as community organizing participants in educational institutions, community-based agencies, or nonprofit organizations.  

Satisfactory completion of this course earns 3 Raza Studies Major Core units and/or 3 units of the GE Segment III RELATIONSHIPS OF KNOWLEDGE - "La Raza Immigrant Community in the San Francisco Bay Area" Cluster

Specific Raza Studies Outcomes

This course helps learners achieve the following twelve specific Raza Studies objectives and outcomes:

*   Develop a deeper understanding of seminal writings, videos, and other materials documenting past and present multiethnic mass mobilization and collective action among US Latin@s particularly in the greater San Francisco Bay area.

*   Develop a more multidisciplinary approach to the various methodological practices and theoretical perspectives available for the organizing individuals and collectives among la raza.

*   Gain a more holistic, comprehensive or transdisciplinary, appreciation of the diversity of Raza community organizations, as well as the factors affecting their development over time and space.

*   Improve critical thinking, reading, writing, listening and speaking skills during our comparative study of Raza organizing in its community-centered contexts.

*   Understand and be able to critically assess Raza community organizing in a historical context and be able to discuss some prime examples and its main themes over time and space.   

*   Understand and be able to critically assess the role of mass mobilization and collective action in the Chicano/Latino community's struggle for social change in the U.S.

*   Understand and be able to critically assess the basic components of a grassroots organizing and its main organizing strategies.

*   Understand and be able to critically assess specific historical and contemporary issues related to immigrant, labor, youth and women organizing.

*   Strengthen the ties between academic institutions and the community at large.

*   Provide opportunities for practical experience in real community organization contexts.

*   Integrate readings and discussions with community service learning.

*   Inspire and provide essential skills to incorporate community organizing as a life long practice.

General Requirements

Learners must satisfactorily complete all assignments, even if late.

All late attendance and late work will be penalized accordingly.

All students are required to have a SFSU e-mail account and use it to participate in this course's online Blackboard component by engaging in discussions and using e-research resources. Students may sign up for free computer accounts at the University Computer Center Help Desk, ADM 110, in the West Wing of the Administration Building.

Cellular phones and pagers are allowed on silent mode only.

Required Readings

All must read the following three texts.  

Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals.   Vintage Books, 1989.

Ross, Fred.   Conquering Goliath - Cesar Chavez at the Beginning.   El Taller Grafico Books, 1989

Larry Salomon, Roots of Justice:   Stories of Organizing in Communities of Color.    Jossey-Bass, 1998.

Required readings can be bought from the SFSU Bookstore, Amazon.com online or at Modern Times Book Store, 888 Valencia Street, San Francisco. (415) 282-9246.  

Required Participation (up to 35 points possible).  

Successful completion of this course requires regular class attendance (10 points) and regular participation in small group (10 points) and online discussions (10 points) and final class presentations (5 points). These are essential for developing the necessary skills and understandings.

Required Assessments (up to 35 points possible).  

There are two (a midterm and final) course assessments.   Each includes a mix of multiple choice, true false, short answer and essay questions to assess your outcome learning of the essential materials found in course readings, presentations and discussions.   An excellent midterm assessment will earn 15 points, and due on Friday March 19 .   An excellent final assessment can earn 20 points, and is due Monday May 24 at 1:30 pm.

Required Critical Writings (up to 30 points possible).  

Successful completion of this course requires timely submission of several different kinds of critical writings.

1. Your five page required reflexive community organizing essay (up to 10 points possible) should examine your past experiences as preparation for becoming a community organizer.   You should use significant collective action experiences or mass mobilization events to underscore your interpretive critical analysis of how these reflect who you are now, and how these makes you similar to and/or different from others in your immediate familia and/or wider community. Your essay should have the following five sections of more or less one typed (doubled-spaced) page each: I. My Introduction of Issues, II.   My Approaches and Perspectives, III. My Findings,   IV. My Interpretive Critical Analysis, and V. My Summary and Conclusions. It is due March 5 .

2. Your ten-page original community service learning project report (up to 20 possible points) should be organized with the following five sections: I My Introduction of Issues (one page), II. My Methods and Models (one page), III. My Findings (four and a half pages), IV. My Interpretive Critical Analysis (two and a half pages) and V. Summary and Conclusions (one page). It should include a list of references to specific primary (interviews and observations, etc.) and secondary (specifically, the three required texts and videos observed in class, etc.) sources of information, to make your points. In order to receive full credit, each learner must submit a report that substantively reflects at least 30 hours of community service learning work with an approved community service agency or community organizing project (be sure to attend the CSL Fair). This community service learning emphasis reflects the commitment of Raza Studies to sharing the resources with the community through working with its agencies. Your report is due May 19 .

Final Course Grade .

The final course letter grade is based on the sum of points accumulated:

100 (or more) = A+       89-92=B+       77-80=C+       65-68=D+      

97-99=A                85-88=B       73-76=C       61-64=D

93-96=A-                     81-84=B-   69-72=C- 57-60=D-

RAZA 680.01 #14676

RAZA COMMUNITY ORGANIZING [CESD]

COURSE SYLLABUS

Spring 2004

MWF, 1410 - 1500, BH 352

Professor Jose B. Cuellar, Ph.D. (http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~josecuel/)

Email: josecuel@sfsu.edu      Vmail: 415 338-6044  

Office hours in Psychology 422 on MWF 8-9 am and 1-2 pm.  

Expanded Course Description

The focus on this upper division Raza Studies course is on community organizing among Latinos in the United States.   We critically examine the potentials and limitations of mass mobilization and collective action toward the resolution of community problems.   We evaluate various elements and techniques for organizing individuals, developing community leaders and resources, acquiring and directing personal and public power.    We analyze existing organizations and the effects of their definitions of community priorities and goals. (Formerly LARA 680).

This course presents multiple models and methods of community organizing to enhance our critical understanding of how hegemonic values and actions by dominant individuals, institutions and ideologies affect la Raza community, and evaluate the development of grassroots organizing in a historical context. We examine community organizing among documented and undocumented rural farm workers and urban day laborers, barrio youth and suburban students, mujeres and personas mayors, immigrants and natives, from coast to coast.   The core of this course is its community service-learning format with students serving at least three hours per week as community organizing participants in educational institutions, community-based agencies, or nonprofit organizations.  

Satisfactory completion of this course earns 3 Raza Studies Major Core units and/or 3 units of the GE Segment III RELATIONSHIPS OF KNOWLEDGE - "La Raza Immigrant Community in the San Francisco Bay Area" Cluster

Specific Raza Studies Outcomes

This course helps learners achieve the following twelve specific Raza Studies objectives and outcomes:

*   Develop a deeper understanding of seminal writings, videos, and other materials documenting past and present multiethnic mass mobilization and collective action among US Latin@s particularly in the greater San Francisco Bay area.

*   Develop a more multidisciplinary approach to the various methodological practices and theoretical perspectives available for the organizing individuals and collectives among la raza.

*   Gain a more holistic, comprehensive or transdisciplinary, appreciation of the diversity of Raza community organizations, as well as the factors affecting their development over time and space.

*   Improve critical thinking, reading, writing, listening and speaking skills during our comparative study of Raza organizing in its community-centered contexts.

*   Understand and be able to critically assess Raza community organizing in a historical context and be able to discuss some prime examples and its main themes over time and space.   

*   Understand and be able to critically assess the role of mass mobilization and collective action in the Chicano/Latino community's struggle for social change in the U.S.

*   Understand and be able to critically assess the basic components of a grassroots organizing and its main organizing strategies.

*   Understand and be able to critically assess specific historical and contemporary issues related to immigrant, labor, youth and women organizing.

*   Strengthen the ties between academic institutions and the community at large.

*   Provide opportunities for practical experience in real community organization contexts.

*   Integrate readings and discussions with community service learning.

*   Inspire and provide essential skills to incorporate community organizing as a life long practice.

General Requirements

Learners must satisfactorily complete all assignments, even if late.

All late attendance and late work will be penalized accordingly.

All students are required to have a SFSU e-mail account and use it to participate in this course's online Blackboard component by engaging in discussions and using e-research resources. Students may sign up for free computer accounts at the University Computer Center Help Desk, ADM 110, in the West Wing of the Administration Building.

Cellular phones and pagers are allowed on silent mode only.

Required Readings

All must read the following three texts.  

Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals.   Vintage Books, 1989.

Ross, Fred.   Conquering Goliath - Cesar Chavez at the Beginning.   El Taller Grafico Books, 1989

Larry Salomon, Roots of Justice:   Stories of Organizing in Communities of Color.    Jossey-Bass, 1998.

Required readings can be bought from the SFSU Bookstore, Amazon.com online or at Modern Times Book Store, 888 Valencia Street, San Francisco. (415) 282-9246.  

Required Participation (up to 35 points possible).  

Successful completion of this course requires regular class attendance (10 points) and regular participation in small group (10 points) and online discussions (10 points) and final class presentations (5 points). These are essential for developing the necessary skills and understandings.

Required Assessments (up to 35 points possible).  

There are two (a midterm and final) course assessments.   Each includes a mix of multiple choice, true false, short answer and essay questions to assess your outcome learning of the essential materials found in course readings, presentations and discussions.   An excellent midterm assessment will earn 15 points, and due on Friday March 19 .   An excellent final assessment can earn 20 points, and is due Monday May 24 at 1:30 pm.

Required Critical Writings (up to 30 points possible).  

Successful completion of this course requires timely submission of several different kinds of critical writings.

1. Your five page required reflexive community organizing essay (up to 10 points possible) should examine your past experiences as preparation for becoming a community organizer.   You should use significant collective action experiences or mass mobilization events to underscore your interpretive critical analysis of how these reflect who you are now, and how these makes you similar to and/or different from others in your immediate familia and/or wider community. Your essay should have the following five sections of more or less one typed (doubled-spaced) page each: I. My Introduction of Issues, II.   My Approaches and Perspectives, III. My Findings,   IV. My Interpretive Critical Analysis, and V. My Summary and Conclusions. It is due March 5 .

2. Your ten-page original community service learning project report (up to 20 possible points) should be organized with the following five sections: I My Introduction of Issues (one page), II. My Methods and Models (one page), III. My Findings (four and a half pages), IV. My Interpretive Critical Analysis (two and a half pages) and V. Summary and Conclusions (one page). It should include a list of references to specific primary (interviews and observations, etc.) and secondary (specifically, the three required texts and videos observed in class, etc.) sources of information, to make your points. In order to receive full credit, each learner must submit a report that substantively reflects at least 30 hours of community service learning work with an approved community service agency or community organizing project (be sure to attend the CSL Fair). This community service learning emphasis reflects the commitment of Raza Studies to sharing the resources with the community through working with its agencies. Your report is due May 19 .

Final Course Grade .

The final course letter grade is based on the sum of points accumulated:

100 (or more) = A+ 89-92=B+ 77-80=C+    65-68=D+      

97-99=A                85-88=B   73-76=C 61-64=D

93-96=A-              81-84=B-   69-72=C- 57-60=D-

56 (or fewer) =F