The Social Perception, Attitudes, Mental Simulation Lab

Social Perception and Identity Publications


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Publications by Topic Area

Social Perception
 

 

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Publications

Social Perception Papers from the SPAMS Lab

The SPAMS Lab examines the perception of others and the perception of the social self (viz. identity) as related aspects of social perception. (Traditionally, "social perception" has referred only to the perception of others.)

Note: Clicking on any link to a paper below is interpreted as a personal request on your part to see this work. Your ability to view the .pdf of this work constitutes my response to your personal request to see that specific paper.

(Publications are reverse chronological order and may be cross-listed with other topics)

Tate, C. C., & Pearson, M. D. (2016). Toward an inclusive model of lesbian identity development: Outlining a common and nuanced model for cis and trans women. Journal of Lesbian Studies, 20, 97-115. [view .pdf]

Tate, C. C., Youssef, C. P., & Bettergarcia, J. N. (2014). Integrating the study of transgender spectrum and cisgender experiences of self-categorization from a personality perspective. Review of General Psychology, 18, 302-312. [view .pdf]

Tate, C. C., Ledbetter, J. N., & Youssef, C. P. (2013). A two-question method for
assessing gender categories in the social and medical sciences. Journal of Sex Research, 50, 767-776. [view .pdf]

Tate, C. C. (2012). Considering lesbian identity from a social-psychological perspective: Two models of "being a lesbian." Journal of Lesbian Studies, 16, 17-29. [view .pdf]

Tate, C. (2011). The "problem of number" revisited: The relative contributions of psychosocial, experiential and evolutionary factors to the desired number of sexual partners. Sex Roles, 64, 644-657. [view .pdf]*

Tate, C., & Audette, D. (2001). Theory and research on 'race' as a natural kind variable. Theory and Psychology, 11, 495-520. [view .pdf]

*Note: Both the Smith and Konik (2011) intro to the special issue and Buss and Schmitt (2011) commentary incorrectly refer to me using male pronouns. The correct referents are female pronouns.